Choosing a theme, the most exciting part in building a WordPress site

Lots of people from around the world use WordPress for their websites. Most of them use it for their blogs. Because WordPress offers the possibility of a website you can entirely control and personalize, one to carry your signature. It allows you to have the last word when it comes to your website’s design and performance.

There are many steps in the process of building a site by yourself, but there is only one that people really like and enjoy: looking for a great theme.

Experiencing with so many beautiful designs, layouts, colors, and lots of other visual elements can become relaxing at some point. I guess we all know that browsing for themes is the greatest part in building a site.

A theme is very important if not the key in making your site popular. That’s because the front-end is always the bridge between you and the visitor. If your theme has an engaging design and an easy-to-access interface, the user will stay. And later he will return. The visuals and the content structure are always crucial to convincing your visitor to read further and not go away.

So yes, in this case, do judge a book by its covers!

The difference between free themes and premium themes?

Money.

Nope, I’m just kidding. Money is just one of the differences, but not the most important.

Many free themes are good and look great. But if you want your site to be known, you should consider buying one. Why?

  • Premium themes have a better quality and are better coded.
  • Unlike the free ones, they offer full support and are updated very often. Updates are VERY important!
  • Most of them have a more attractive and engaging design. They are also coming with an user-friendly interface and a more complex set of customization options that are really easy to use.
  • They are more feature-rich and the premium ones come with the whole package while most of the free ones only provide the basics. You will rarely see a free theme with all the vital features a site needs.
  • Premium themes are secure. The free ones have various vulnerabilities.

How do you know which one is “the one”?

  • Make a sketch with exactly what you need for your website – what do you want it for and why, the target audience, what could make your site be known, how would you like it to look etc. Make a list with all the necessary features.
  • Look for the best themes in your work field, e.g. photography, corporate, medical etc.
  • Make sure it has the features you really need and don’t get trapped by less useful ones.
  • Ask for opinions, read comments and advice from people who experimented with certain themes.

Must-have features for a theme

  • Responsiveness. We’re living in a time when mobile phones rule the world.
  • Easy-to-use interface. It should be easy for any user to simply make the customization by themselves.
  • Cross-browser compatibility. What if there are still people using Internet Explorer?
  • If you need a website for marketing purpose, you should check if your theme has optimization for SEO, social media, and speed. Google’s search engine will surely appreciate it.

Customizing a theme is not difficult at all. The customization can be done right from your admin panel. You’ll simply be directed by intuitive steps.

WordPress is offering you unlimited choices – I’d dare to say – to improve your experience in working with the platform. And the best thing is that it’s all up to you. You can choose what you need and you can also customize and change everything by your own.

With WordPress, you can do almost whatever you want. The only problem is that sometimes you need money. 

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